Joel Newman VanHook[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]

Male 1821 - 1902


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  • Born  Jun 1821  Halifax, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 16
    Gender  Male 
    Died  1902  Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Father  Jacob VanHook, Jr.,   b. 1797, Halifax, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1825, Halifax, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Frances Newman,   b. 1 Mar 1800, Person, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1882, Cross Timbers, Hickory, MO Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family  Mary T. Hickman,   b. Mar 1823, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1898 and 1910, Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  5 Jan 1842  Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Sarah Ann VanHook,   b. 1842
     2. Martha J. VanHook,   b. 1845, Lebanon, Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1880, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Littleberry Jacob VanHook,   b. 1848,   d. 9 Jun 1920
     4. Joel Wright VanHook,   b. May 1858, Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jun 1936, Wilson, TN Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Living
     6. Living
     7. Living
    Last Modified  20 Apr 2015 
    Family ID  F563  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • Joel settled in the Bartons Creek (1841) area on Franklin Road in Wilson County, Tennessee. (He came with his widowed mother before 1829 since she remarried in Wilson Co., then). They lived in a log house just east of Barton's Creek. 1860 Census of Wilson County Tennessee said he was born in North Carolina. He was a farmer and 39 at the time. Another source says Halifax, VA. 1870 Census of Wilson County Tennessee said he was 49. Thomas E. Partlow, comp. Wilson County TN, Deeds, Marriages, and Wills 1800-1902 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1987), p.74

      5394 - 1853 May 10 -(Petition) Petition of Joel N. VANHOOK, admr. of Snowden HICKMAN, dec'd. against Jessee W. ROWLET and his wife, Lucy, formerly Lucy HICKMAN, William C. HICKMAN, Zachariah HICKMAN, Martha Ann HICKMAN, Jacob S. HICKMAN and Francis HICKMAN all of Wilson Co., TN, except William C. HICKMAN non resident of TN. Snowden HICKMAN died intestate in Wilson Co., TN in the early part of 1852 ... widow, Francis and 5 children all under 21 except Lucy ROWLET. Prior to his death Francis filed a bill of divorce ... they compromised and he gave her a deed of gift during her life ... remainder to children ... 6/7ths.

      Joel M (sic) Van Hook will, 22 June 1900; wife; B. J. Van Hook; other children: John M. Johnson; grandson Walter Van Hook. Recorded August 15, 1900.

      He was a private in the Civil War and fought in the Battle of Murfreesboro (See endnotes) He was discharged Feb. 2, 1863. (Comp. B 45th Infantry Reg.)

      In late December an army of 50,000 under William Rosecrans moved out from Nashville to confront the Confederates thirty miles to the southeast. Once again, after successfully driving back the Union flank on the first day of battle, December 31, the Confederate advance faltered and wore itself down battering against strong defensive positions. On January 2, Bragg launched a disastrous infantry assault in which the Southerners were decimated by massed Federal artillery. The next day, as a bone-cold Army of Tennessee trudged away from Murfreesboro, it left behind one of the bloodiest battlefields of the war. One of every four men who fought at Stone's River became a casualty.

      William Rosecrans was Joel's 7th cousin!

      More on the battle from http://californiacentralcoast.com/commun/map/civil/statepic/tn/tn010.html

      After Gen. Braxton Bragg's defeat at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862, he and his Confederate Army of the Mississippi retreated, reorganized, and were redesignated as the Army of Tennessee. They then advanced to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and prepared to go into winter quarters. Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans's Union Army of the Cumberland followed Bragg from Kentucky to Nashville. Rosecrans left Nashville on December 26, with about 44,000 men, to defeat Bragg's army of more than 37,000. He found Bragg's army on December 29 and went into camp that night, within hearing distance of the Rebels. At dawn on the 31st, Bragg's men attacked the Union right flank. The Confederates had driven the Union line back to the Nashville Pike by 10:00 am but there it held. Union reinforcements arrived from Rosecrans's left in the late forenoon to bolster the stand, and before fighting stopped that day the Federals had established a new, strong line. On New Years Day, both armies marked time. Bragg surmised that Rosecrans would now withdraw, but the next morning he was still in position. In late afternoon, Bragg hurled a division at a Union division that, on January 1, had crossed Stones River and had taken up a strong position on the bluff east of the river. The Confederates drove most of the Federals back across McFadden's Ford, but with the assistance of artillery, the Federals repulsed the attack, compelling the Rebels to retire to their original position. Bragg left the field on the January 4-5, retreating to Shelbyville and Tullahoma, Tennessee. Rosecrans did not pursue, but as the Confederates retired, he claimed the victory. Stones River boosted Union morale. The Confederates had been thrown back in the east, west, and in the Trans-Mississippi.

      Result(s): Union victory
      Location: Rutherford County
      Campaign: Stones River Campaign (1862-63)
      Date(s): December 31, 1862-January 2, 1863
      Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans [US]; Gen. Braxton Bragg [CS]
      Forces Engaged: Army of the Cumberland [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]
      Estimated Casualties: 23,515 total (US 13,249; CS 10,266)

      1847, Jan 6 From records found in the Wilson Co Courthouse, Joel purchased 26 acres on Barton's Creek from William Hickman for
      $200.00.

      1848, May 24 Snoden Hickman to Joel N. Van Hook, 23 acres on Barton's Creek for $230.00. DB-X, pp 90-91.
      1848, Aug 23 Joel sold 49 acres of land to Hope H. Skean (his brother inlaw) for the sum of $500.00.

      1850 Wilson Co TN Census:
      VAN HOOK, Joel 29 VA
      Mary T. 26 TN
      Martha 5
      Littleberry 2
      Sarah 8

      1852, Nov 25 Joel was the Administrator to his step-father's estate. (Snowden Hickman, Jr).

      1853, Apr 19 Joel N. Van Hook, Administrator of Snowden Hickman, deceased to Jesse W. Rawlott, 58 acres. DB-Z, p 312.

      CONFEDERATE
      1861, Dec 9 Enlisted Member of Company "B" 45th TN Inf. at Trousdale, TN, by Lt L. M. Hunt. Mustered in 4 Jan 1862; Temporarily consolidated with 23rd Batt'n TN Inf. about Nov 1863, & 26th TN Inf. in Jan 1865. Became a part of 4th Consol'd. Reg't TN. about Apr 9, 1865. He fought at the Battle of Murfreesboro.

      1863, Feb 2 Pvt Van Hook discharged. I ceritify, that the within J. N. Van Hook, a private of..................., Co "B" of the 45th Reg't of TN
      Volunteers, born in Person Co NC. Aged 41 years, 6' 2" high, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair, and by occupation a farmer, was
      enlisted by Lt L. M. Hunt at Trousdale, TN on Jan 4, 1862, to serve one year, and is now entitled to discharge by reason of IMBALANCE
      TO GENERAL. The said J. N. Van Hook was last paid by Capt L. P. ........................ to include the 31st day of Aug 1862, and has pay
      due from that date to present date. There is due him........... For pay from Aug 31, 1862 to Feb 2, 1863 and being.....months and 2
      days, at $11.00 per month. For pay for clothing, not........ to 8th day of Oct 1862, $66.73.
      Amount $101.93
      Balance paid $101.93

      1885 The family moved to the 22nd Dist, Wilson Co TN.

      1900, Aug 15 Joel's will recorded, it was handwritten on an ordinary piece of note paper. (Found on p 411, Bk 21, 1896-1902, Wilson
      Co Courthouse).

      About Winger, a slave of Joel Newman:
      Here is the text from the interview. I used OCR and it needs a little
      correcting but you'll get it.

      Source: Works Project Administration. Federal Writers Project.Slave
      Narratives. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data
      from: Works Project Administration. Federal Writers Project. Slave
      Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews
      with Former Slaves. Washington, D.C.: n.p.

      State: Texas Interviewee: ~, Winger
      "I was born at Wilson about thirty, miles east from Nashville, March 15,
      1849, de year de white folks all rushed 'roun out to Kaliforni fer de gold.
      My Mammy was Sarah Vanhook. My Daddy was Marse Vanhook a white man what owned
      Mammv an I don't know no name fer him 'cep ole Marse. Sarah Vanhook was born
      on a plantation in Virginia an' brought to Tennessee an' sold to Marse
      Vanhook wen she was notnin but a baby. Marse Jim bought Mammy an' one sister.
      I'ze nebber heard tell of nobody wid my name "Winger", my Mammy found it in a
      book. She had seven bovs.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      "De dav ob Freedom, Mammy went up to de Marse's house, an atter a-while she
      come back an call us all togedder an say: "Well chillun, I'ze got to hunt us
      a home dis momin." She lef us an went about four miles to a man name Mr.
      Vivrette, an' hired herself as a cook which all de count~ 'roun know she's de
      bes what is. When she lef ole Marse's she had us four boys an a bed an' a few
      clothes. Us tied em up an toted 'em to de cabin on de Vivrette place. Four ob
      us boys was ole enough fer Marse to sen 'em to de War an dey nebber come
      back. I wukked on de Vivrette farm an' Mammy cooked fer dem an us.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "Durin' de war us made a crop ebery' year, but de Yanks took all de corn an'
      meat an ebery' thing time an agin, an' lef us not a bite of somethin to eat.
      I seed de slaves sold on a block lots ob times. Dev'd strip 'em an l
      buyers see ef dey had stripes, 'case de scars 'ud make a servant not worth so
      much. Yessum, dey made de wimmen take all dere close off an effen dey fussed
      'bout doin it, dey got de blacksnake whip 'rapped 'roun righ smart. No'
      wam't none ob us chilluns sold. Ole Marse say dat's his young'uns an' d
      gwine lib at he home 'twel he die. He allus tole Mammy dat she gwine hab a
      cabin an a patch ob ground' to raise her young'uns on, long as he got a spot
      oh land.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "But ole Marse Vanhook had consid'rble lan' an stock an was a big man 'roun
      dere, but he got killed in de War an' de family los so much dey couldn't keep
      us atler Freedom, 'case dev didn't hab nuttin' deyselves. Us'd stayed right
      dere effen dey could, a-keep us. De Vanhooks thought Mammy was de fines
      pusson on de airth. Dere wuzn't no oberseer an us nebber was whipped ceptin
      by Mammy. Us had good close an cabins as good as eny servants eny whar but oh
      course dev was home made cloth."Us wukked fer de Vivrette family ba
      Tennessee an when dey took a-notion to come to Texas whar dey folks was, dey
      brought us all too.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanllo~k, Winger
      "Yessum, dere was some bad servants, but not on de Vanhook place. Us all
      wukked an did as Marse said an' didn't want to run away. On some ob de places
      near us, de servants runned way an staid in de woods some ob dem was shore
      bad. Dey stole to git something to live on an' fought dere selves an every
      boddy,. One was an outlaw. Ile stole a mowing blade from some whar an put a
      handle on it. He's jes mow folkses down dat crossed he path. De ole folks sav
      dev bet he killed someboddv ebrv hour. I don't know 'bout dat, but he w
      shore a bad man. All us kids was feared to go fer from whar de folks tole us
      case us jes knowed dat outlaw ud git us. Us kids was nacherlv wild as Jack
      rabbits eny way~. I liked to play marbles but us wain't 'lowed to play fer
      keeps.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "When us was little, dey put us down in a floor to eat. De cook ud put a ham
      bone in a pot to boil an' make corn dumplins an' put a pot of dumplins an'
      pot licker down in a trough in de floor an' us 'd git all 'roun it an e
      like hogs. But us Vanhook chilluns et wid Mammy in de big kitchen an us shore
      was taught manners. Us had to turn thanks an us shore didn't drink our coffee
      outen no sasser. Mammy was raised in de big house an she was mos white an she
      could read an rite an sech. Yessum she an ole Mistis taught us Vanhook
      chillun to read an rite an figger. But de odder sarvants didn't care so much
      'bout it an dere mammies didn't care neidder. My Mammy got a switch atter us
      an made us lam.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "Oh, yassum us played lots. Us'd go fishin. Ud git a bent pin an put it on a
      string an fassen a piece ob bacon on it an fish. No, didn't nebber catch
      much, but it was fun. Den when us got bigger, us'd fish in a big tank. When
      us catched a perch er a cat dat weighed one or t'vo pounds, did us holler! De
      sarvants had lots ob picnics an ole Marse ud gibe us meat fer barbecue. Dere
      was lots ob water melons in de field an us got one when ever us wanted one.
      Dere was lots ob apples in de orchard, an' peaches an plums, jes all you
      wanted. Mammy allus put up all dey could eat ob p'sarves an jelly an' sech.
      After de War, she did jes de same fer de Vivrettes an dey gibed her lots fer
      her chillun to eat. De bes fruit ob all kinds grows back in Tennessee, I
      shore wish I could go dere before I dies.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "For de War an atter, us'd haul cords ob wood an put it on de north side ob
      de orchards. Den in real cold weather, us'd build big fires to save de fruit.
      De smoke ud keep de fruit from freezin. Black berries, dew berries an
      raspberries all grow wild on wore out hill sides. Dere ud be eight an t
      acres patches ob wild black berries an wild strawberries. Dey didn't plant
      dem dey jes growed every. whar, in fence rows an ebery, whar. Us'd dry fruit
      by de bucket fulls. Us'd build big shelves an tables in de yard to p
      peaches an apples on to dry'. Dere was fifteen er twenty acres ob grapes on
      de Vanhook place an big patches ob grapes on mos all de odder plantations.
      Dere was wild grapes but not no mustang grapes like in Texas.
      "Dere was possums, coons, same as here (Texas), but no Jack rabbits nor no
      horned frogs an no prairie dogs, but dere was a groun hog. Dat sayin 'bout de
      groun hog seem he shadow, dat's whar de groun hog has he home, back in
      Tennessee. Dey didn't raise no cotton, but dey raised Irish potatoes. corn,
      wheat, red clover an hay. Hay ud last two or three years an clover ud too,
      before it played out.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Winger
      "Back in Tennessee, dey had turnpikes an had to pay toll at de toll gates.
      Dey paid ten cents on a horse; twenty-five cents on a wagon an team; walkers
      (persons walking) did not pay; a double rig had to pay a quarter. Dey'd put a
      long pole across de road an den no one couldn't git across de bridge. Dere
      was a keeper at bofe ends ob de bridge. De main turnpike was made ob rock an
      dey allus had good bridges an was kep in good condition. De toll gates was
      ten or fifteen miles apart.

      State: Texas Interviewee: V anhook, Winger
      "I wukked at Pilot Knob in Tennessee jes before I come to Waco. Lots of
      people come to Texas from dere. Mongs dese was Marse Berry Trice, Lee
      Russell, John Vivrette, an Dick Vivrette. Mammy used to cook fer all de
      fore dey lef back dere. I bringed Nelse Vanhook out to Texas along wid Marse
      John Vivrette when Nelse was jes a little boy. Den I went back an stayed till
      Mammy an' Marse John Vivrette come here (Texas). I was married an had t
      chillun when dey come to Texas. Mammy come us an I kep her till she died. She
      said she was over a hunnerd years ole an all de white folks say she older dan
      dat. She died eight years ago. (1929)

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      "De Vivrettes come to Waco an us did too. By den wild turkey an' deer w
      scace 'bout Waco, but I went wid de white folks an killed lots ob em on de
      Bosque an up north ob Waco on de ribber. Dat was is now. Dears ago. Dev was
      raisin cotton on Columbus Street as fer down town as whar Eighth Street
      Suspension Bridge was a toll bridge den. Fer several years I wnkked fer
      Marse James Baker at his brick yard in Fast Waco an' hauled brick. Drove a
      span ob de meanest black mules to de brick wagon. I farmed fer fust one an
      den anodder; wukked fer de Rail road an' jes general work. I had been doin
      yard work fer de pas few years. De ole man gittin de rumatiz too bad an my
      jints too contrairy to do much. De white women de say dat I got "green
      fingers" as de ~'psy folks say. Dat means dat I hab good luck in gittin
      flowers an' garden stuff to grow.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      "Oh, yassum, I members when I got married. Been married three times. Oh, dat
      furs weddin? Well, musta had on a suit ob close. Don't member dat fur, but I
      allus had good close case I wnkked hard an dressed an et good. Lordey, dat's
      a powerful long time to member a woman. But dat fiirst one was
      shore a good woman. She been dead dese twenty years now but deres none like
      her. I'ze tried it twice sence den an dese young wimmin don't know nod din an
      won't work. I'ze de fadder ob seven chillun.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger "I belong to de African Methodist
      church an am a Republican.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Win2er

      No'm no special song. Effen a song is sung good, I likes it, effen it is
      sung like it ought to be. I likes all 'ligious songs.

      State: Texas Interviewee: V anhook. Winger
      "Yassum, I members de big house on de Vanhook plantation mighty well. It was
      a big double house an had lean-to rooms on de back. It was two storied an'
      had a big porch with big pillars all across de front ob it. It was made oh
      weather board dat de sarvants cut an drawed outen de woods. Dere was lots oh
      big trees around in front oh de house to big shade an fer de chillun to play
      in. De Marster had him a little log house in de yard fer an office an' dere
      was anodder little house whar de men had dere guns an dey sit in dere by de
      fireplace an swop yarns. In de back was de barns an stables an my Mam
      house an fudder on was de "Quarters" whar de sarvants slep. Each family had
      'em a little one room log house wid a split palm fence an back ob dese houses
      in each yard was a chicken house sometimes a hog pen an' den a few fruit
      trees ob various kinds. But mos ob de fruit trees was in de big orchard. Dere
      was a smoke house, wash house, an carpenter shop. Dere was two gardens. One
      wus fer flowers an one was fer vegetables. Dat was old Mistis' special
      property.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      "Mv Mistis was de real king pin. She allus knowed whar every: supply was kep
      an how much meat, flour, meal, sugar, coffee an sech was needed to run
      things. She knowed jes how much thread de spinners oughter spin in a day an
      how many yards ob cloth de wimmin oughter weave. Ebery mornin she us sot de
      tasks fer de wimmin whether it was settin eggs, er makin butte
      spinnin room or loom room er kitchen, she knowed jes what she wanted to hab
      done an when an who. She was a little bit ob frail woman but she was a power.
      She was de bes doctor 1 eber knowed. When folks got sick she'd take charge an
      den effen her medicine didn't do de work, den she'd call a doctor. She took
      keer ob de sarvants as like de family. She ud come down in de dead ob de
      night to look atter things effen she got a worry' 'bout some of 'em.

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      "My Mammy she was right long side ob ole Mistis. She nussed de chill
      cooked but she had a couple of gals to hope her in de kitchen. She jes
      managed things. She de one dat did de whippin, en case de chiliun got to
      rambunctious. De Vanhooks held her as a member ob de fambly an effen dey
      hadn't los eherything to dem Yankee soljers us'd had a piece ob land 't
      now. Dere was a Butler an a Kerridge Driver an ploughers, an wood choppers an
      all like oh dat befo' de war.
      "Lan sakes alive, us chill un, white an black had a good time. Us was all
      ober de place; robbin birds nestes in de orchard; er fishing an goin in
      washin in de deep holes; er riding de plough horses to an from de field effen
      us could wangle de ride; runnin de calves; an colts an fightin de old
      ganders. All de black chillun wore a long shirt, it come down to de middle ob
      de legs an' you couldn't tell a gal from a boy, cepn de white girls. Dey wore
      great big bonnets an dey was sewed to dere hair to make em keep em on to
      perteck dere faces from de sun.

      State: Texas Interviewee: V~hook, Winger
      "De larger servant gals mos' en usual wore blue dresses. Mos all de servants
      ud sing when dey wukked. In de summer, de white folks us go horse back ridin
      any hay rides in de moon light an dances an visits to dere frens. Right atter
      de War fer Sev'ral years, I'd go wid crowds ob white men on long huntin' an
      fishin' parties an' show 'em what de bes places was. Bof in Tennessee an' in
      Texas. I has ranged all ober de Bosque hills an known de bes fishin pools eny
      whar."

      State: Texas Interviewee: Vanhook, Winger
      Interview wi~th Winger Vaithook, Waco, McLennan County, Texas.


      I've got some interesting news. Here are some new documentation along with a
      few found previously:
      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson Co., TN: Trust Deed Book KK and Grand Jury
      Evidence 1846-1880, (Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 2000), 19, J. Z. [sic]
      Blythe to Joel N. Vanhook a girl named Sarah, abt 17, 22 Jan. 1849 p.264.

      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson Co., TN: Slave Schedule for 1860, 58, (for
      Joel Newman Van Hook) 1 slave house; 1 f 32; 1 m 10; 1 m 8 mu; 1 m 2 mu.

      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN: Trust Deeds, 1828-1868,
      (Greenville SC: Southern Historical Press, 1997), 244, Joel Vanhook to Jesse
      Rowlett my three Negroes, viz. Sam, about 12; Lewis, about 8; and SARAH,
      about 27. 14 Dec 1860 (p. 139).

      Wilson County, TN Deeds, Book F#2, O.C. Kidder, trustee for Patrick H.
      Viverett, C. J. Owen, 50 acres in the 21st district. Bounded: Barton's Creek
      Church, Vanhook, and Hickman, 5 Sept. 1866, p. 212.

      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN: Chancery Court Records,
      1842-1892, (Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1997), "Patsy Jennings, a woman of
      color, vs. Julius Jennings, a man of color. Said parties married abo
      years ago. They lived together until a little over 2 years ago. The sa
      Julius Jennings abandoned the defendant. He took up with SARAH VANHOOK by
      whom he has had a child. Said Patsy Jennings is seeking a divorce. 21 Aug
      1876 p. 154-55.

      1880 Census of Wilson Co., TN, Sarah Van Hook (B) Age 45 along with Cressy
      age 6 [DOB would be 1835; however, ages are always estimates for former
      slaves).

      Notice that Joel got Sarah January 22, 1849. If Winger was born March 15,
      1849, then Sarah was already pregnant when she arrived on the Van Hook
      homestead. If a white man was the father of Winger, then it would have to be
      J. G. Blythe. Of course, Winger could also be wrong on his own birthday as
      he appears to be wrong on so much other stuff. In 1850 Joel did have an
      infant slave; so I believe Winger's date is correct. Notice also the
      citation putting a Viverette family next door to the Van Hook farm. It
      appears that Winger and his mother moved to Waco, Texas in the mid-1880s.
      Winger married Victoria Porterfield in May 30, 1882 and Sarah is on the 1880
      census. I haven't check the 1890 census yet. Also, examine the Jennin
      citation. If the child from Mr. Jennings soon after he "took up" with Sarah
      then the child would have to be born in 1874. The 1880 census of Wilson
      County lists Sarah Van Hook, age 45 (about right) and a Cressy, age 6.
      Cressy is exactly the right age to be connected to Mr. Jennings, which I
      think it likely is. There is a Sam Van Hook (B) listed in the 1880 census
      which is very likely the same Sam listed in the deed to Jesse Rowlett (Joel's
      step-sister's husband). It isn't clear whether he is connected to Sarah or
      whether he is, in fact, Winger. Is there any family tradition of a Sam? It
      is difficult to explain why Winger's interview is accurate in some areas
      (like birth date, his mother's name, belonging to the Van Hooks in Wils
      County next door to the Viverettes) yet appear to be wrong about such things
      as "Marse Van Hook" dying in the war and the Van Hooks given Sarah when she
      was just a baby, when in fact she was about 17. Compare the Rowlett citation
      with the 1860 slave schedule. Lewis is listed as about 8 which fits with the
      8 year old mulatto in the slave schedule of the same year. Could Joel still
      be the father of SOME of Sarah's children even if Winger isn't? Winger did
      allude to Joel claiming a plurality of children! What happened to the two
      small children from the slave schedule that doesn't appear in the Rowle
      deed? Why did he keep them just as the war started? Why does Winger give
      such glowing report of the Van Hooks when they weren't especially unusual at
      the time? This needs more research on Winger's side. Why isn't Winger
      listed more in Wilson county other than of his marriage. Is Sam and Winger
      the same person? Joel calling him Sam and his mother calling him Winger.
    • (Medical):blue eyes, light complexion, light hair

  • Sources 
    1. [S22] 1860 Census of Wilson County, TN.
      Age 39; wife Mary, age 37; Martha, 15; Berry 10; Mary 4; Joel 2.

    2. [S24] 1870 Census of Wilson County, TN.

    3. [S25] Will of Joel Newman Van Hook, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN, Deeds, Marriages, and Wills 1800-1902, (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1987), 74 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S14] Van Hook Family, Fred M. Van Hook, (Lebanon, TN: Creative Graphics, 1982).

    5. [S26] Wilson County Archives, Marriage Records.

    6. [S27] Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996).
      "Joel N. Vanhook to James Rice, 50 acres in the 21st dist. as deedof trust . . . east by James Rice, west by Barton's Creek . . . 17 Oct. 1868 (p. 74-75)."
      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996), 7. "Joel N. Vanhook to James Rice, 50 acres in the 21st dist. as deed of trust . . . east by James Rice, west by Barton's Creek . . . 17 Oct. 1868 (p. 74-75)."

    7. [S27] Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996).
      "Joel Vanhook and Winny Vanhook to Snoden Hickman a negro girl named Jane, about 11, 22 Nov. 1842 (pp. 204-205)  He and his sister must have given or sold the slave to their step-father.
      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996), 121. "Joel Vanhook and Winny Vanhook to Snoden Hickman a negro girl named Jane, about 11, 22 Nov. 1842 (pp. 204-205).

    8. [S27] Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996).
      "Joel N. Vanhook to John F. Sherill, negro girl named Betsy 19 July 1853 (p. 296)."
      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN, Trust Deed Books 1868-1894, (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996), 169. "Joel N. Vanhook to John F. Sherill, negro girl named Betsy 19 July 1853 (p. 296)."

    9. [S28] Wilson County, TN: Slave Schedule fo 1850, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., (Lebanon, TN: Thomas E. Partlow, 1996).
      1 female 20, 1 female 9, 1 male -1

    10. [S29] Tennesseean's in the Civil War, Vol. 2,, (Nashville: Civil War Centennial Commission, 1964).
      Fred M. Van Hook states, "A veteran of the Civil War, Pvt. Joel N. Van Hook was a member of Company B 45th Infantry Regiment from the State of Tennessee. This is taken from Civil War records in Nashville and [this book]. . . . He fought at the Battle of Murfreesboro and was honorably discharged February 2, 1863. Update: I've gotten photocopies of the rolls and pension application as proof
      Tennesseean's in the Civil War, Part 2, Nashville: Civil War Centennial Commission, 1964 (Located in the Wilson County Library).

    11. [S30] Voter Registration List & Oaths of Loyality, 1864-1886, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., ((Wilson Co., TN: Partlow, 1974), 48).
      Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Voter Registration List & Oaths of Loyality, 1864-1886, (Wilson Co., TN: Partlow, 1974), 48.

    12. [S31] Wilson Co., TN Miscellanous Records 1800-1875, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., (Easley SC: Southern Historical Press, 1982), 24 (Reliability: 3).
      "Guardian Settlements 1841-1845 (p. 165): "Thomas Vaughn Guardian. Guardian of Joel N. Van Hook who was a grandson of Jacob Vanhook, now deceased of the State of Virginia and him and his sister are the representatives of their father entitled to a distributive share of the said deceased he having died intestate. The guardian also conveyed their interest in a tract of land in North Carolina for a negro woman who was conveyed to him for them by a bill of sale made by Kendal Vanhook. Recorded 14 December 1842

    13. [S20] Minnick Correspondence, (Betty Minnick (bjhappy@pacbell.net) descendant of Frances Newman).

    14. [S19] Some Loose Chancery Court Records, Wilson County, Judy Henley Phillips, ed., (http://www.tngenweb.org/wilson/wilson5.htm).
      5394 - 1853 May 10 -(Petition) Petition of Joel N. VANHOOK, admr. of Snowden HICKMAN, dec'd. against Jessee W. ROWLET and his wife, Lucy, formerly Lucy HICKMAN, William C. HICKMAN, Zachariah HICKMAN, Martha Ann HICKMAN, Jacob S. HICKMAN and Francis HICKMAN all of Wilson Co., TN, except William C. HICKMAN non resident of TN. Snowden HICKMAN died intestate in Wilson Co., TN in the early part of 1852 ... widow, Francis and 5 children all under 21 except Lucy ROWLET. Prior to his death Francis filed a bill of divorce ... they compromised and he gave her a deed of gift during her life ... remainder to children ... 6/7ths.

    15. [S32] Wilson County, TN Deeds.
      Deed Book N (p.95) William Hickman to Joel Newman Van Hook, 26 acres, it being land my father willed me; bounded: Lemuel T. Hickman, Jan 6. 1847

    16. [S33] Goodspeed History of Wilson County, Tennessee, (1886).
      Says, "The father [Joel N.] was of German lineage, born in 1822, on the line between North Carolina and Virginia, and was a farmer by occupation. He came to Tennessee with his mother, and at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1841, was living in Wilson County. He bought land in Barton's Creek, in the Twenty-first District, where he lived for forty years. In 1885 he moved to the Twenty-second District, where he now resides. He is the father of six children, all of whom are living. The mother was born about 1824, in Wilson County, Tenn., and is also living."

    17. [S25] Will of Joel Newman Van Hook, Thomas E. Partlow, comp., Wilson County, TN, Deeds, Marriages, and Wills 1800-1902, (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1987).
      probated